The Road Trips In Life

Tuesday, June 19th, 2018
It’s funny, isn’t it? The road trips we take through life. The people we meet and the conversations we have along the way. It’s usually when we’re close to our destination that’s when we have panic attacks. I often see this displayed through my son.

The greatest lessons we’ll ever learn as parents are the essential ones taught by our children. At such a young age, he teaches us about road trips. The journey we undergo and take on throughout our lifetime. It took us 11.5 hours to arrive at our destination, with four short breaks. As a family, we laughed endlessly, danced uncontrollably, and practiced how to say, “hello” and “bye bye” with our hands. When the car was parked, Micah Isaiah (MIT), drove us away, with his little roaring laugh thrilled that he was upfront with Daddy, he turned (at least tried to) the stirring wheel with  so much excitement. He made our hearts burst with joy because he was so happy.

Thirty minutes to our destination, MIT grows impatient. If he could talk, what would be his sentiments? “Are you guys serious? I’m still in my car seat! It’s been two hours already! It’s time for a break! Get me out of here Mama! I’m over this road trip!” My little boy would let me have it. I chuckled to myself, as I thought about his words to us, as he cried this painful screeching sound. It didn’t matter what I said. He wanted out now and fast. About five minutes to our destination he finally calms down. He just sighes a defeated breath; “Mama’s not taking me out of my car seat, and Dada’s still driving.”

~Arrival~

We arrive, and MIT bounces up full of life. “Yessss!” Eyes wide open. “Freedom!” As he takes in his new surroundings, I watch him, while taking in us, his parents. At that moment, it dawns on me; we are a reflection of this child. We act out differently, but our feelings are the same.

~Destination~

It’s always when you’re close to a destination; a blessing that remains unmarked, anxiety kicks in. We become disoriented with our emotions, uncertain in ourselves, and the ONE in charge of us. The wait to what’s next is never easy. It’s more daunting than anything. But when we trust in the ONE who knows and wills all things; we realize our fear is only about things that are imaginary, not fixed reality. When we consume ourselves in fear we lose sight of our present peace. We miss the importance of what we have in front of us. We disregard who we are and all we possess within ourselves. The wait does two things it could mold us by making us better people to ourselves and others, or it could make us turn away from our morality.

Road trips are fascinating and filled with adventure in the planning stage. The preparation for it is the nonexistent phase. But, when it’s time to ‘hit the road’ life has a way of coming at you fast. Perspective keeps you focused; while distractions causes unbelievable accidents. Embrace the road trips in life. Allow them to teach you the beauty of waiting, trusting, and believing in your future destination.

Signing Out,

W.S.Thompson

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The Magnificent Year of Three

2017, has undoubtedly been the year of God’s favor. When Micah and I got married on March 15th, 2014, the infamous question at our reception was, “When are you guys having babies? Have babies!” Our relatives shouted with excitement, “Have lots of them too!” I, more so than Micah, would respond, “2017! In three or five years we’ll have children.” Micah was more sound in his response to our loved one’s inquiries; he would respond, “when God says it’s time, we’ll have children.” Sure enough, 2017 was the year when God said it was time. Our joy, Micah Isaiah, came into this world on Thanksgiving day, on a beautiful snowy morning. He was one week early.

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Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017: Precautions: Worst Case Scenarios

The night before delivery, I was at peace. I was beyond ready to meet my baby boy. The doctors came in my room to inform me of the worst case scenarios. If the spinal anesthetic doesn’t work, they would have to do a general anesthetic, and that included a breathing tube like my previous surgery, and I would be completely asleep. If I lost a lot of blood, then they would have to give me a blood transfusion, because my iron levels were deficient.

I listened to the doctors, and as they were speaking to me, I kept on repeating in my mind, “that won’t be my story. I will be up to witness my son’s birth, and the same blood that saved me before will be more than enough to get me through surgery.”What I’m living was once impossible to man, and somehow God said, “I’m making it possible for you.” Only a living God can turn a dream into a reality. Only the source of all my joy could have me witness what I cried endless tears of sorrow about, just years before. Our God is sovereign; his promises are real and thorough. Despite what the doctors said, we knew the arms that were ultimately giving us peace. It was well, and it is still well with our soul.

Thursday, November 23rd, 2017: Thanksgiving 2017: D-Day

I hardly slept the night before. There was so much to anticipate. My son coming into this world and my cesarean. I got up at 6 am and started getting ready. By the time the nurses came in, I was ready.

Time to go down to the operating room. I said to Micah, “follow us.”I’m with you babe,” he responded. The two nurses that were taking me down were so confused. “Where is the father going?” They asked each other in Korean thinking we didn’t understand. (Serious eye-roll) “He’s going to the OR with us. Dr. Kim said it was okay.” I responded. “Huh?” Confused looks came across their faces. The mad black woman, buried deep within me, started coming out slowly. I was so sick and tired of the cultural differences we had to go along with- with no viable explanation. What also frustrated me was the lack of communication- there wasn’t a note in the file; and there were so many different faces, exchanging looks of disbelief. “Husband In OR room?”In Korea, it is not common for the husband to be in the OR room during a cesarean birth. However, Dr. Kim and the rest of our medical team made an exception for Micah to be there with me.
After giving me the spinal anesthetic, which worked, thanks be to God! My beloved walked in the OR and came close to me, “I’m here, babe. Just relax. I’ll rub your temples for you.” As he did that, I could sense him praying for me quietly to himself. He took care of me; talking to me, soothing me with his words. He sang to me the songs we sang throughout my pregnancy. It Is Well, Draw Near, and Be Lifted Up by Bethel Music. As we sang together, I felt a lot of pressure. The doctors started counting, “hana, tul, set.” (one, two, three) Then I heard him, my precious Micah Isaiah, his cries were faint but strong. He just kept on crying. They wrapped Micah Isaiah in a blanket and brought him close to my face and rubbed him against my cheeks. I massaged his hair while endless tears flowed from my eyes. I was only able to touch him for one to two minutes. As the nurses quickly took him away, Micah went over to him but was unable to hold him at that point for they already placed our little one in an incubator.

Micah followed the nurses with Isaiah out of the OR, as the doctors finished up my surgery. A few hours later, I finally made it upstairs. They brought me to the nursery and from there informed me I couldn’t see my son nor breastfeed him. “Why?” The mad black woman started to rise in me again. Micah told me he hasn’t been able to hold him and won’t be able to hold him until we were discharged from the hospital. “What?!?! You’re his father!! He has to be with his parents!” Micah came close to me and held my hands, “Babe, they are running test and are worried about his oxygen levels.” “His oxygen levels? What’s wrong with them?” I asked. “They dropped below 90. They have to do a blood test and chest X-ray,” He responded.

Our son was born with an enlarged heart and was unable to breathe on his own. The first 72 hours after his birth, Micah was only able to see him for 30 minutes a day, through the nursery window. I was unable to see him at all the first 24 hours. I was on bed rest because of the spinal anesthetic they gave me before surgery.

Friday, November 24th, 2017: Emotional Rollercoaster

I was an emotional wreck. I couldn’t believe after carrying my child for nine months, loving him, bonding with him, preparing and praying for him. Neither one of his parents were able to be present the very moment he needed us the most; the hours after entering the womb of this world. It was heartbreaking and was nothing like what we imagined in our minds. As the hours slowly crept by a sense of peace came over us. Micah and I started speaking the word of God and praying for our boy. We knew God was our ultimate source. After a long while, I stopped worrying about the condition of my son. Something within me confirmed he would be okay. I texted my good sister-friend Kormasa; I wrote, “we believe God for a good report.” “Yes, great expectations are coming.” She responded back.

Saturday, November 25th, 2017: Great Expectations

Sure enough, God was fighting on our behalf! The blood test and the chest X-ray came back normal. Our son was able to breathe on his own. On Saturday, I was able to breastfeed him. The first time I held him, I just stared at him in awe. I was fascinated by his smile and his many facial expressions. I listened attentively to his cry capturing his voice to memory. I remembered exactly the amount of times he sneezed. He reminded me he was his father’s son when I heard his long farts and the twist on his face when he was pooping. He has his Papa’s nose and his Mama’s lips. His facial features are a beautiful blend of both his parents. I recall looking into his little eyes and wondering what was he thinking? I sang to him and had him listen softly to the worship songs I’ve heard throughout my pregnancy. It soothed him, and he fell asleep soon after. My precious baby boy, my hidden treasure, one of my greatest joys: Our little Micah Isaiah, I can’t believe he is my son. A double portion of the love I share with my beloved husband, Micah Josiah.

It’s been three weeks since we’ve taken him home from the hospital. Life’s been quite the adjustment since he’s fully entered our lives, but we wouldn’t change it for the world. He’s a good boy, and we love him more and more each day. Last week, we had our first doctors appointment for Micah Isaiah, and the doctors said, he’s a healthy boy and progressing very well. We praise God for his faithfulness and greatness towards us. I can’t believe he’ll be one month old as of next week! Time sure does fly by fast! Cheers to The Thompson’s Magnificent Year of Three!

Signing Out,

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

~The Thompson Clan~

Listen. Write. Speak.=Inklub

Hello, World!

Micah and I been active on our new youtube channel, The Inklub. Below are our latest videos on our page. Check them out!

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With a baby on the way, I’ve been thinking a lot about “pregnancy-related things.” Thus, the title shouldn’t surprise anyone. But, this poem goes beyond the anticipated birth of our son. There’s an even greater birth that I’m anticipating. Take a listen.

What makes words so powerful? Here’s my explanation. – Micah

Powerful spoken word about race relations in a foreign country. Take a listen.

One word to describe my life: Drum. – Willynn

Pregnant In A Foreign Country

Many have been asking the undeniable question, ”How does it feel to be pregnant in a foreign country? How does that even work?” I’m sure if I was living in the States and one of my girlfriends was pregnant abroad I would be asking the same question. So, it’s easy to sympathize with the concerns of family and close friends.

I must say long before I became pregnant I started researching and talking to different expats that had their babies here in Korea. Out of all the different women I spoke to, and all the information I gathered, nothing made me apprehensive about becoming pregnant. My biggest concern was finding an English speaking doctor that had experience working with foreign women with my past medical condition. It did not take long to resolve that issue.

My gynecologist, Dr. Sejeong Oh from Queen’s Medical and OBGYN Clinic, not only speaks excellent English but is highly attentive to me, my baby, my concerns, and has the experience I needed to trust her. I am very thankful and grateful for her. A lot of expats recommended her because of her compassionate nature towards her patients, her willingness to answer questions, her ability in elaborating on complicated medical terms and providing a comfortable place in her clinic for her patients. Dr. Oh highly recommended my obstetrician, Dr. Sumi Kim from St. Mary’s University Hospital, to deliver Baby T. Both doctors are women (which was very important to me personally) who are well trained and experienced in their fields. They both communicate effectively and have been providing me with the best possible care.

I first started seeing Dr. Oh when I was four-five weeks pregnant. After confirming my pregnancy, she gave me a form for the Pre-Natal Care Discount Voucher. It’s better known as the Kook Min Hong Bok Card. The pregnancy voucher entitles women a maximum subsidy of 500,000 KRW (about $450 USD) to pay for doctor visits and other expenses regarding the medical care of the baby. Since being pregnant, I only had to pay an equivalent of $15.00 out of pocket. The National Health Insurance System in Korea is amazing compared to what I use to have in the States.

As for my job, my contract entitles me to three months of maternity leave. Another perk is during the first and third trimester I’m able to leave work two hours earlier than usual. In Korea, government employers are very sensitive towards women who are in their early and late stages of pregnancy. They know it’s a very critical time for the baby’s development. I work at two schools after the logistics of my maternity, and early leave was figured out. A lot of my colleagues wished me well and were very excited about my pregnancy. Of course, they had endless questions that varied from personal to superficial (which I expected), but the overwhelming amount of love I received was astounding, to say the least. My country school always gives me vegetables from the school garden to take home with me. At lunch time, they always have fruits and fresh vegetables for me to eat.

My students started suspecting I was pregnant as of last week. One of my fourth-grade girls asked my co-teacher if I was pregnant and less than five minutes later the news spread like wildfire. I remember last Friday walking on the school bus, and countless students were pointing at my stomach saying, “Willynn Teacher, 아기, 아기 (baby, baby).” “Yes, baby,” I responded and then came the wave of applause and little people with excited faces.

I cannot fail to mention the extraordinary support Micah and I have at our local church, Saeronam English Ministry. I remember during my first trimester I had the weirdest form of morning sickness. I was constantly nauseous, but not to the point of throwing up. For two weeks, I had no appetite. I couldn’t take certain smells, and I was always tired. Several women from the church offered me help and support. They calmed my many anxieties. They bought me herbal remedies that helped with nausea and were always present. Not a day went by without at least one of the women from the church checking in on me. I’m so grateful for them.

Pregnancy in another country could be scary for most, but as for me, my heart is at peace. Micah and I have outstanding people in our community who have become adopted parents, siblings, and of course amazing friends. The Thompson’s are truly blessed. Of course, I miss my biological parents, especially my mama’s cooking. But even from afar, they have been a tremendous support to us by asking what we need, sending us care packages in the mail, and making an honest effort to communicate with us once a week. Sometimes I’m just blown away by the amount of love that surrounds us near and afar. Yes, it takes a courageous soul to do what we are doing. However, you never know what outcome can come out of breaking out of your shell and doing something outside of the ordinary. Following faith requires much sacrifice, but sacrifice brings forth abundant rewards that surpass the understanding of common men.

Signing Out,

Esther Lynn

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

Inklub

My husband, Micah and I started a new YouTube channel called, the Inklub. Below is a description of what the Inklub is all about. I hope all my readers will check out our new channel and subscribe.

Inklub is a channel where we will share our writings to inspire, encourage, and sometimes even challenge our viewers to think differently. Most of our videos will be spoken word pieces, but we also plan to share songs, stories, and various other creative presentations.

Our writings are inspired by the world around us; whether it be our experiences or others. As we observe, we listen, we write and then speak out our perspectives.

We believe there is something undeniably therapeutic about words–the right words. That is why we are so adamant about sharing what we’ve written. We hope you enjoy this channel. Feel free to subscribe and connect with us.

Till Next time Friends,

Esther Lynn

Wednesday, June 14, 2017